Category Archives: Mom’s Corner

The Simplicity of the Word

As I prayed and pondered about what I could share this month to encourage my sisters in Christ, this verse caught my attention during my morning Bible time. “Rejoicing in hope; patient in tribulation; continuing instant in prayer (Romans 12:12). That verse is short enough you could memorize it without much effort, if you don’t already know it. Now consider what it would do for your life if you kept it in your heart and chose to do exactly what it says.

Rejoicing in Hope

In Romans 12, Paul gives many instructions for life with Christ and what that looks like in the nitty, gritty of each day for a believer. In this particular verse, we are to do three things, starting with “rejoicing in hope.” We know what it looks and feels like to rejoice in something. We are happy and pleased about it, maybe even excited. The Greek word for “hope,” according to Strong’s Expository Dictionary, is used 48 times in the New Testament, and it means: “to anticipate, usually with pleasure; expectation (abstractly or concretely) or confidence: — faith, hope.” We are to rejoice in hope. Here it doesn’t tell us exactly what hope we rejoice in. From all the places hope is used in the New Testament, it has a broad range from the hope of salvation, our place in heaven, to the hope of change for a difficult situation. When our minds go to rejoicing in hope, we move away from fretting, worry, complaining, anger, disappointment, and a host of other negative thoughts and emotions.

Patient in Tribulation

If that wasn’t enough, next we are told to be patient in tribulation, and Paul knows real tribulation! No surprise in what those Greek words mean. Patient, again according to Strong’s Expository Dictionary, is: “to stay under (behind), i.e. remain; figuratively, to undergo, i.e. bear (trials), have fortitude, persevere: — abide, endure, (take) patient(-ly), suffer, tarry behind.” While tribulation is: pressure (literally or figuratively): — afflicted(-tion), anguish, burdened, persecution, tribulation, trouble.”

Here is our direction for those situations that are hard, the ones we consider tribulations. Stick the problem or trial out with a persevering attitude. That sounds pretty tough. We don’t see a place, for what our normal reactions would be such as escape, fear, or grumbling. Instead, we are to go through it with patience as described by that Greek word.

Instant in Prayer

Finally, we have “continuing instant in prayer.” Strong’s tells us that “continuing instant” means: “to be earnest towards, i.e. (to a thing) to persevere, be constantly diligent.” Earnest, persevere, and diligent give a vivid picture of putting forth effort, not something that simply happens. How often do you find yourself thinking about a situation in your life or a loved one’s life, only to have negative emotions arise? Could that be because you aren’t “continuing instant in prayer” but are allowing your mind to dwell on the troubling situation instead?

Living It Out

Have you memorized that verse? If you haven’t, what would stop you from it? Then once it is in your mind, I challenge you to keep using it throughout your day. Make sure that you are doing the things it suggests you do, earnestly and purposely. Take your biggest problem causing negative emotions and hold it up to a life lived with Romans 12:12 and see where following the instructions in that verse moves you. I think it will change your perspective, free you from discouragement, remove angry feelings, dismiss bitterness, help you to not worry, and give you a heart of joy. I love this verse, but I need the encouragement I am sharing with you in this Mom’s Corner as much as I think you might. May we be women who live Romans 12:12.

May I add a P.S. to really conclude this Mom’s Corner? After I wrote it, a couple of situations happened – small in the overall scheme of things – but enough that I started mulling on them, with negative emotions surfacing right alongside the thoughts. Almost immediately, I remembered the Mom’s Corner verse and wanted to do what it directed. Simple – yes! Hard – yes, because sometimes it is almost as if we would like to hold on to the negative emotions so we avoid what moves us away from them. Blessed – absolutely. Peace is a lovely way walk.

Posted in: Mom's Corner

The Simplicity of the Word

As I prayed and pondered about what I could share this month to encourage my sisters in Christ, Romans 12:12 caught my attention during my morning Bible time. “Rejoicing in hope; patient in tribulation; continuing instant in prayer ().” That verse is short enough you could memorize it without much effort, if you don’t already know it. Now consider what it would do for your life if you kept it in your heart and chose to do exactly what it says.  

Rejoicing in Hope

In Romans 12, Paul gives many instructions for life with Christ and what that looks like in the nitty, gritty of each day for a believer. In this particular verse, we are to do three things, starting with “rejoicing in hope.” We know what it is to rejoice in something. We are happy and pleased about it, maybe even excited. The Greek word for “hope,” according to Strong’s Expository Dictionary, is used 48 times in the New Testament, and it means: “to anticipate, usually with pleasure; expectation (abstractly or concretely) or confidence: — faith, hope.” We are to rejoice in hope. Here it doesn’t tell us exactly what hope we rejoice in. Looking at all the places hope is used in the New Testament, it has a broad range from the hope of salvation, our place in heaven, to the hope of change for a difficult situation. When our minds go to rejoicing in hope, we move away from fretting, worry, complaining, anger, disappointment, and a host of other negative thoughts and emotions. 

Patient in Tribulation

If that wasn’t enough, next we are told to be patient in tribulation. Paul knows real tribulation! No surprise in what those Greek words mean. “Patient,” again according to Strong’s Expository Dictionary, is: “to stay under (behind), i.e. remain; figuratively, to undergo, i.e. bear (trials), have fortitude, persevere: — abide, endure, (take) patient(-ly), suffer, tarry behind.” While “tribulation” is: “pressure (literally or figuratively): — afflicted(-tion), anguish, burdened, persecution, tribulation, trouble.”

Here is our direction for those situations that are hard, the ones we consider tribulations. Hang in there with a persevering attitude. That 

sounds pretty tough. We don’t see a place for what our normal reactions would be such as escape, fear, or grumbling. Instead, we are to go through it with patience.  

Instant in Prayer

Finally, we have “continuing instant in prayer.” Strong’s tells us “continuing instant” means “to be earnest towards, i.e. (to a thing) to persevere, be constantly diligent.” Earnest, persevere, and diligent give a vivid picture of putting forth effort, not something that simply happens. How often do you find yourself thinking about a situation in your life or a loved one’s life, only to have negative emotions arise? Could that be because you aren’t “continuing instant in prayer” but are allowing your mind to dwell on the troubling situation instead? 

Living It Out

Have you memorized that verse? If you haven’t, what would stop you from it? Then once it is in your mind, I challenge you to keep using it throughout your day. Make sure that you are doing the things it suggests you do, earnestly and purposely. Take your biggest problem causing negative emotions and hold it up to a life lived with Romans 12:12 and see where following the instructions in that verse moves you. I think it will change your perspective, free you from discouragement, remove angry feelings, dismiss bitterness, help you not to worry, and give you a heart of joy. I love this verse, but I need the encouragement I am sharing with you in this Mom’s Corner as much as I think you might. May we be women who live Romans 12:12. 

Adding a P.S. to really conclude this Mom’s Corner! After I wrote it, a couple of situations happened – small in the overall scheme of things – but enough that I started mulling on them, with negative emotions surfacing right alongside the thoughts. Almost immediately, I remembered Romana 12:12 and wanted to do what it directed. Simple – yes! Hard – yes, because sometimes it is almost as if we would like to hold on to the negative emotions so we avoid what moves us away from them. Blessed – absolutely. Peace is a lovely way walk.

Trusting Jesus,
Teri Maxwell

Helps for Your Productive Summer

Most have noticed the negative effects on today’s youth from spending hours watching TV and movies or playing video games. Laziness, bad worldly attitudes, and an appetite for more entertainment is the consistent downward trend of today’s youth (sadly including Christians). “Whose end is destruction, whose God is their belly, and whose glory is in their shame, who mind earthly things” (Philippians 3:19). I believe you don’t want that for your children. May I encourage you to redeem these summer hours and turn them into beneficial use of time for your children? “See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, Redeeming the time, because the days are evil” (Ephesians 5:15-16). I was thinking about how we could help you with that and the resources we have available. Let me briefly share those ideas with you.

What about reading rather than screen time? Here are ways to use the 14 children’s reading books that we offer. Of course, children who can read could simply read them. What about an older child reading them to younger siblings? Maybe you want bonding time and would read them out loud while your children cuddle around you. After that, you might have discussions about the book’s content. You could also look at what is in the book that your children can try themselves – starting personal Bible time, a garage clean-out/organization project, an anniversary date at home for Dad and Mom for the children, or an IJN (In Jesus Name) project. So many are pleased to tell us of the great things their children learn and then emulate from the Moody books. There are multiple options for using these books this summer or at any time.

What about making a chore plan and teaching chores to your children of all ages this summer? I have a delightful story of a mom who invested in her children when they were little, giving them chore responsibility, and the delightful memories a now grown-up daughter has of that. 

“One of my earliest and fondest memories is when I was something like 3 years old. We lived in a small apartment — my parents and my brother. He must have been at kindergarten, because it was always in the morning when my mother tidied up. At that time we had a rug with fringes, and it was my job to straighten the fringes! Just imagine! Straightening the fringes is more or less useless in a family with little children, but I remember how eagerly I tried to do a good job. My mother always pointed out how good we worked together in making our home neat and clean. I guess my mum just wanted to keep me busy so that she could do the cleaning as efficiently as possible. What I remember up to this day is the wonderful feeling of being helpful to my mum. I told her the other day, and we both laughed about this. She also remembers those days as a precious time.”

That mom was doing much more than building memories in her little girl’s heart. She was teaching her to enjoy work and be responsible. She was giving her a sense of worth in contributing to the good of the family and home. She was building a sense of accomplishment in a job well done. What a powerful investment for the future good of her little girl! We have a book called Managers of Their Chores to help you with a chore system.

Finally what about helping your children become good conversationalists this summer? Being able to have a conversation is at the root of relationships – in the family, neighborhood, work, church – wherever your children are and whatever their age. A good conversation might be the forerunner of a beautiful marriage. It might help your child obtain his dream job. It could be the path to leading someone to the Lord. Are you equipping your children with conversation skills for life? Our book Making Great Conversationalists assists you with this task and gives you projects as you work toward this goal.

Be committed to a productive summer with your children, instilling good habits and character in them rather than taking the path of least resistance by letting them be entertained by their devices or TV. Make plans now so that it will happen. If you don’t, school begins before you know it, with disappointment in your heart for nothing of value to show from your summer. 

Four Key Questions

Steve and I are working at decluttering in our attic. In the course of that, I came across an envelope with personal Bible time journal pages from 30 years ago. At that time I was using a small 3 ring notebook for what I wrote regarding Bible time each day. Obviously I took the pages out when the binder was full and stored them in this envelope. On each journal page was the verse I picked and copied from my reading for the day and my thoughts concerning that verse.

Also at the top of each page, I had written out these four questions:

How is this to build faith?

How am I to trust God in this?

How can I see Christ in this?

What kind of character will it build?

I wrote those questions out each day because I wanted to learn them by heart. Then I desired to use them in situations in which I found myself, especially difficult situations, where I would struggle with a good attitude. Looking for the positive in the midst of a storm helps pull us through the gale. It gives purpose and meaning to something that otherwise seems futile and distressing. 

Think about each of these questions and how they would relate to turning your mind from thoughts that will keep you in anxiety or self pity to ones that set your mind on the One Who will carry you through the problem.

How is this to build faith? “But without faith it is impossible to please him: for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him” (Hebrews 11:6). As we face trials, we want our faith to grow not be shipwrecked.

How am I to trust God in this? “And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose” (Romans 8:28). We have so many promises in Scripture that we can turn to as we trust God in those times of hardship. 

How can I see Christ in this? “And from Jesus Christ, who is the faithful witness, and the first begotten of the dead, and the prince of the kings of the earth. Unto him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood” (Revelation 1:5). There are so many ways to do this from recalling how He interacted with people and dealt with difficult things when He walked the earth to the core of Who the God/Man is to Who He is in my life and much more. 

What kind of character will it build? “My brethren, count it all joy when ye fall into divers temptations; Knowing this, that the trying of your faith worketh patience. But let patience have her perfect work, that ye may be perfect and entire, wanting nothing” (James 1:2-4). God wants to grow us through our tribulations.

Maybe these questions are ones you would like to learn and ask yourself as you face difficult tasks or situations. If so, start writing them at the top of your Bible journal page for the day and before long they will be memorized, or just memorize them. With the questions in your mind, go through each one when you face that trial. Even better would be to briefly write the situation out and the answer to each question in another journal. I didn’t do that, so 30 years later I can’t tell you the times I used those questions, the details of the struggle, nor my answers. I wish I had notebooks filled with all of that. I think that would have been an even greater discovery!

Posted in: Mom's Corner

Mom’s Corner Novemeber 2023 – To Fret or Be Thankful

Feelings of disappointment flooded me, as I came out of my visit with a second podiatrist for help with a heel malady that hasn’t resolved itself since beginning earlier this year. Even though I liked and interacted with this podiatrist better than the previous one, the appointment hadn’t met my expectations. I expressed those thoughts to Steve and then dwelt on them in my mind.

Steve encouraged me that Scripture (Psalm 37:8) says that fretting doesn’t lead to good outcomes. It is true. Through my reactions and thoughts, I was fretting and that was making me discouraged, glum, and unhappy. Not the emotions I wanted to carry through the day.

In a recent morning Bible time, I read, “By him therefore let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of our lips giving thanks to his name” (Hebrews 13:15 ) and was pondering using it as the theme for a November Mom’s Corner, since this is Thanksgiving month. I hadn’t planned to be a poor example of it, though!

I have two verses memorized that also directed me with what to do rather than fret, “In every thing give thanks: for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus concerning you” (1 Thessalonians 5:18). And then there was this one, “Giving thanks always for all things unto God and the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Ephesians 5:20).

There are key words and phrases from these three verses that give us critical information for the path of thanksgiving:

  • sacrifice
  • praise to God/unto God
  • continually
  • thanks to His name, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ
  • in every thing
  • will of God
  • always for all things

Why would thanking God be a sacrifice? Could it be because our flesh wants to do exactly what I did – dwell on the negative, allow disappointment to direct my thoughts, and fret? So to combat the flesh, we are to make the sacrifice of praising God. That is even defined in Hebrews 13:15 as our lips – speak it out loud – giving thanks to His name, continually. We choose to worship Him in thanksgiving rather than worshipping self in self pity.

Next we learn how often this thanksgiving is to happen – continually, in everything, always, and for all things. That is quite inclusive. It doesn’t give room for worry, fretting, complaining, or negativism. Thanksgiving and negative emotions don’t coexist well. Sometimes it is easy for us to forget that mindset of continual thanksgiving and to move into critical words and thoughts. Perhaps those kinds of wrong thoughts and words, should remind us that we aren’t giving thanks, continually for all things in God’s name. Then we can repent and go back to those right and godly thoughts.

A key verse that helps me in this thankfulness process is our beloved Romans 8:28, “And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose.” When it doesn’t look like something we would want to be thankful for, we can say this verse to ourselves or even out loud to another. That reminds us of God’s goodness, His faithfulness, and His ability to work in ways we can’t envision.

As we prepare to celebrate our national holiday in the United States of Thanksgiving, may I encourage you (and me) to be thankful, not just on Thanksgiving Day, but as a sacrifice to God continually for all things in His name.

Trusting Jesus,

Teri Maxwell

June 2023 Mom’s Corner – The Productive Summer Schedule for Homeschoolers

A productive summer schedule can help homeschoolers (or anyone) toward desires or goals you have for your summer months. Perhaps those would include doing some homeschooling, accomplishing activities that don’t fit into a homeschool year, or simply relationship building.

Whatever the desire, purposefulness in making a schedule should give time to work on various aspects that lead to its achievement. Often moms get to the end of their summer dismayed with their lack of productivity and disappointed that they didn’t accomplish what they had envisioned. Your schedule is a tool that will let you look back on summer with satisfaction rather than regret.

If you haven’t scheduled before, summer is a perfect time to learn scheduling because usually summer has a more relaxed pace than the school months do.

List and Pray

To begin, write your desires for summer accomplishments onto a list. Having these desires in writing means you can visualize the ideas all together. You have a limited amount of time and energy so what you want to accomplish will be mitigated by that. The list and then the schedule is a reality check for what is reasonable to try to do.

Before you work on the actual schedule, you want to pray and seek the Lord’s direction for what He would have you and your children accomplish this summer. “If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him” (James 1:5). You may grow or shrink the list as you spend praying over it and also evaluating your available time.

Then pray about the actual planning and working out of the schedule since you want God’s help through that process. He is the One Who gives you direction and creativity for how to put the pieces of your schedule together.

Add a Few Notes

Now look at your list of desires for the summer. What needs to be scheduled to accomplish those goals? Start by making notes on your list since a particular goal might mean multiple spots on the schedule.

For example, your list says: summer school. But your note would be more specific – keep math and reading going during the summer by doing it daily. Your list could have: relationship building. Your note with it might say: weekly outing with one child rotating every week through the summer, assign a kitchen helper for each meal, have a daily game time. 

Assign Times

The next step is to put times with what you have on your list. It simplifies the schedule and schedule production if you use the same schedule for summer that you do for the school year when it comes to your normal daily needs. Then you don’t have to relearn that routine for the summer. School time is freed up to assign for your summer accomplishments, but the rest of the schedule remains the same.

If, however, you want to change the whole thing up, your schedule can accommodate. Just be sure to write it down. Trying to keep it in your mind is a setup for failure!

Then you use your notes to help you put what is on your list into time slots on the schedule. What is on it that you will do every day? Plug those into your schedule first. That allows you to evaluate the time blocks you have available for activities that don’t happen every day. If you want to have larger chunks of time for outings, try to group your daily activities together, so that you have several hours that can be scheduled for outings and the activities that don’t happen every day.

Finally what is on the list that you can do a couple of times a week or once a week? Put those into the blocks that are still open after the daily pieces have been entered into the schedule.

Make the Summer Schedule a Reality

Sometimes putting together a schedule seems daunting. That’s usually the case when it is all floating around in your head. Committing the details to paper or the computer, generally flows nicely once you take that first step to begin.

The productive summer schedule for homeschoolers will help you end your summer with a smile as you look back over all that you achieved through those months. 

If you need more scheduling help, I recommend our book called Managers of Their Homes. That book is full of scheduling information plus it walks you step by step through putting a schedule together utilizing the included scheduling kit. 

Here are some other articles on summer scheduling.
The Well Planned, Well-Executed Homeschooler’s Summer
The No-Regrets Summer
Five Tips to Make a Homeschool Mom’s Summer More Productive
A Summer Schedule
Time for Summer Schedule Planning
Summer Schedules


Teri Maxwell 

March 2022 Mom’s Corner

Are You a Dripping Woman?

Scripture presents us with quite a contrast between a contentious, dripping wife and a virtuous one whose husband praises her. It also tells us this: “Every wise woman buildeth her house:

but the foolish plucketh it down with her hands” (Proverbs 14:1). My heart is to be the helpmeet to my husband, Steve, where I am building my house and he would want to call me “blessed.”

Here we see contention and dripping:

“. . . the contentions of a wife are a continual dropping”(Proverbs 19:13).

“A continual dropping in a very rainy day and a contentious woman are alike” (Proverbs 27:15).

Have you ever considered what you might do that would be contentious like the annoying drip, drip, drip of water? Dripping isn’t outright bad, is it? Isn’t it more of an irritation? Perhaps you are aware of some things in your life that are similar to dripping, and maybe you should ask your husband if there are others. Wouldn’t you like to work on getting rid of them?

Drip, Drip, Drip . . . Answering for Another

I didn’t ask Steve about my dripping, but recently I discovered one of mine. I answer for Steve instead of letting him answer for himself. I didn’t even realize I did that until he mentioned it in connection with something else. He is gracious enough to be quiet about it when it happens. In our discussion, it was obvious he didn’t appreciate it and that I do it rather frequently. Drip, drip, drip. He is very capable of answering for himself! I might try to justify answering for Steve by saying I am being a helpmeet. But the reality is that I don’t always know the answer he would give, and if he doesn’t view it as being a helpmeet, it certainly isn’t.

Drip, Drip, Drip . . . Critical Spirit

From my past, I can share a few more you might consider. What about being critical of what he does or how he does it? The critical, contentious wife points out the negative rather than focusing on the positive. I remember one time Steve saying to me, “I don’t know that I can do anything to please you.” That came because he would work to improve in one area I had criticized him about only to be faced with a new one. Drip, drip, drip. That is a discouraging way to live.

Drip, Drip, Drip . . . Correcting

Then there is correcting your husband. How often does he not have the details right in something he is talking about, and you step in to fix it? Drip, drip, drip. We justify this one by thinking it is important to have things accurate. In the end, it comes out more as pride. I have it right. He has it wrong. I watch men clam up and give the conversation to their wives rather than continue on with her correcting of him.

Drip, Drip, Drip . . . The Better Idea

My third one is having better ideas. When Steve presented an idea, if I agreed with it, I had a way to improve on it rather than just jumping in with enthusiasm to go with it. And of course, if I disagreed, it spoke that right out as well. In the normal course of husband and wife communication, that will be part of it, but when it is the habit, it can be drip, drip, drip. Steve felt blessed when I could agree with him and join in a plan without having to change it to what I wanted.

This is the godly wife:

“Who can find a virtuous woman? for her price is far above rubies. The heart of her husband doth safely trust in her, so that he shall have no need of spoil. She will do him good and not evil all the days of her life” (Proverbs 31:10-12).

“Her children arise up, and call her blessed; her husband also, and he praiseth her” (Proverbs 31:28).

Dry up the Drip

I expect if you are a wife, you would like to be a virtuous woman whose husband blesses and praises her. Do you have any of these drippings that might move you away from that? Are there other drippings that you are aware of?

Could I challenge you to evaluate if there is any dripping going on in your life and then ask the Lord for His grace and strength to dry them up? If you aren’t a wife, these same things can apply to any relationship.
If you would like more encouragement and challenge on being a godly wife, you might be interested in My Delight – a book for Christian wives.

Trusting Jesus,
Teri Maxwell

May 2022 Mom’s Corner Summer – Get Prepare

Soon summer is once again upon us. Are you prepared to make it a fruitful, productive time for you and your family? To do so, I suggest you pray for the Lord’s direction for summer goals and priorities. “If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him” (James 1:5). Then implement a schedule that sets aside time for what you want to accomplish through the summer. “Go to the ant, thou sluggard; consider her ways, and be wise” (Proverbs 6:6).

We recently received a sweet story regarding some of our products that might motivate and give you ideas to pray about concerning summer goals and routines.

We were reading the 5th book in the Moody’s serie, and we got to the ChorePacks. I told Olivia (7) that we have the same book about chores and even the packs and everything. This was bedtime. 

The next day Olivia copied all the chores she found in the book. I showed her the real chores book, and we added some more. We printed the cards on regular paper and cut them out. Both kids were involved, but Olivia was super excited. We put them in order, and I told them I would print them again, with the numbers on top and on better paper. With only two children and one of them reading, I didn’t think adding the name was needed. But then I thought that they would be happy to see their names on the cards. So I added their names too.  Bedtime came again, and I told my daughter I would work on it that night. She really wanted to start the following morning.

The next morning Olivia told me she could barely sleep because of the excitement of having the ChorePacks and starting the routines. The first day went great. I am very encouraged, too, as I have been having a super hard time keeping myself consistent and having routines. The Lord truly is working through our children (among others) to sanctify us. 

What about working on consistency and routines? This mom says that’s a struggle for her. Over the summer she can work on those for herself and also can teach Olivia how to do her chores. They can find places for chores in the schedule and be accountable for doing them.

Maybe you don’t have time for reading during the school year. That is a great part of a summer schedule. It can be mom read alouds or children reading on their own. Make sure to evaluate the reading material, though. The Moody books drew this mom’s little girl to – wanting to work – a positive appetite. You can inadvertently introduce bad appetites as well if you aren’t watchful. I remember the time I read a book to our children where one child called a sibling, “Stupid.” That was not a word we had used in our home to describe a child. Sure enough, though, after I read that, our children began using “Stupid” in that derogatory nature of each other.

Perhaps the Lord would lead you to Scripture memory with your children through the summer. We have a couple of great series on that on our website:

Scripture Memory Bible and Copying Part 1
Scripture Memory Bible and Copying Part 2
Scripture Memory Bible and Copying Part 3
Scripture Memory Bible and Copying Part 4
And:
Scripture Memory with Little Children Part 1
Scripture Memory with Little Children Part 2
Scripture Memory with Little Children Part 3
Scripture Memory with Little Children Part 4

Is He calling you to grow in your walk with Him? That probably means time spent with Him, focused on Him. I wonder if Sweet Journey could facilitate that? It helps with ideas on what profitably to do when you spend time with the Lord.Maybe this summer you want to develop your children’s conversational skills – and your own in the pro
cess.

We have something for that – Making Great Conversationalists.I didn’t start this Mom’s Corner to be a promotional for our books, but as I thought about your summers and what you might want to accomplish, I got excited about what we have that could enable you. This is the time to get tools for whatever your priorities and goals might be so that you are ready to utilize your summer productively!

Blessings,
Teri Maxwell

ARE YOU PREPARING YOUR SONS?

In 2001, we published a book called Preparing Sons to Provide for a Single-Income Family. A top question many homeschooling families were asking at that time was: How can my sons get good jobs with a homeschool education? Because two of our sons had been taught at home throughout their school years, and because they were earning incomes that could support a family, we wanted to share what we had learned. It was our desire to encourage other families to stay the homeschooling course and to prepare their sons for their futures. That question is as pertinent today as it was then, and Preparing Sons is every bit as important and applicable as it was 23 years ago, maybe more so.

The information in Preparing Sons begins with ages 3 to 6, moves to 7 to 12, then 13 to graduation, and finally post-high school. There is so much in that book that is practical and easily implemented. Families whose sons were in their teens when they bought Preparing Sons, when it was first published, now have sons who are in their late thirties. Many of those families read that book and set it aside, continuing to live just as they had been living. Now in some of those families, there are sons who are struggling needlessly in adulthood. Had their parents caught the vision presented in Preparing Sons, might their sons be in a better position to support a wife and children? 

Then there were other families who read Preparing Sons and said, “We want to do this! We desire this outcome for our sons.” With the Lord, they developed a vision for their sons. They made changes, and they prepared their sons not to be children forever but to be responsible, capable adults. Today they see the positive fruit in their adult sons’ lives.

We think each of you has a desire for your sons to grow to manhood as virtuous, industrious men of God. What are you doing to facilitate that outcome? We often hear from wives who share with us about a husband who is a slave to video games, movies, or other forms of entertainment. How are you raising your children so that they will transition, at the appropriate time, from being a child to being a man?

When our boys became teens, we wanted to direct their time usage into profitable pursuits. Their childhood playtime was replaced by activities that were productive. Of course, they had school that took up much of their day. They might spend other time practicing an instrument, doing lawn maintenance or other chores, and especially important was developing marketable skills. The results were good. “When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I became a man, I put away childish things” (1 Corinthians 13:11).

Time invested in productive pursuits during youth reaps positive benefits not only during those years but throughout their lives. We give our children purpose when they are teens by helping them be productive with their time. We can encourage them toward ministering and studying, while developing and utilizing skills that can be used to generate income in the present and in the future.

So many of the youth of today are hopeless. They don’t know Jesus Christ, and they have no purpose. Their lives are sadly out of control. Many are on anti-depressants. They have nothing worth living for, and they become overwhelmed with the emptiness of their lives.

Your children don’t have to be like that. You can turn the teen years into an exciting time, filled with responsibility and productivity with the accompanying outcome of satisfaction in their lives.

We released another book several years after Preparing Sons called Buying a House Debt-Free: Equipping Your Son. In that book, we trace a path that parents can take to facilitate their son’s ability to purchase a debt-free house before he is 30 or at least have a soldi head start toward that. We want to see all of your sons do what our five sons did: own debt-free houses when they are married.

You love your children. What is your vision for them? Is it a big vision? Ours was. Thirty years ago most would have told us it was impossible to achieve the vision we had for our sons. It wasn’t—not for our sons, not for the other young men whose stories we share, and it doesn’t have to be for your sons.

If you have a son who is currently 13 years or older, will he own a house with no mortgage before he is 30? Can you instill that desire in your little boys who are only 5 or 6? The choice is yours. We want to set this generation of young men on fire for having real purpose in life with the side benefit of debt-free living. What do you want for your sons? Will you accept the challenge?

Prayer

As Christian women, I believe we know the value of prayer, and most, if not all of us,  pray. Through the years walking with Christ, learning to pray, and putting prayer into practice, I discovered some holes in my prayer life. Thankfully the Lord has given me tweaks and tools to fill those holes and make my prayer life more effective.

Hit and miss praying, sometimes called flare prayers, makes it too easy to miss rather than hit or to only hit a couple of targets. Critical to my prayer life was, and still is, a scheduled time completely dedicated to praying – no more missing, just hit, hit, hit. For me, scheduled prayer time is attached to my morning Bible reading time. It happens at a specific time each morning and for a specific length of time. Then through out the day, I can pray, but I know those aspects that are my prayer priorities have been addressed. I don’t go to bed at night remembering all I didn’t pray about and wishing I had been more faithful in prayer.

Perhaps one of my biggest prayer holes was consistency in praying for things that were important to me. Sporadically as they surfaced in importance, I prayed about them. Often I got in ruts of who and what I prayed for, totally forgetting ones that I still desired to invest in praying for. With the utilization of a prayer list, however, all of that changed. Now prayer priorities were on the list and prayer attention given to them. I started out with a prayer notebook, but then moved to a prayer app.

With my prayer list that I could organize, I also left behind the overwhelmed feelings I had of not having time to pray for everything I wanted to pray about. With my prayer list, I assigned some items for everyday, others for several times a week, and still others for once a week. With a prayer app, I could record answers to prayer, and if it was a short term prayer, mark it as completed. If it was a specific request for someone I continually prayed for, I could write each answer in the notes associated with that person. It keeps my list concise, and I am not flipping all over in a prayer notebook like I was before.

With a prioritized and scheduled prayer time and a list of prayer targets, I did not miss praying for those important things. That also spared me the embarrassing moments when someone thanked me for praying about their need while I realized I hadn’t thought of their request again after it was made. I certainly hadn’t prayed for it. Now I get those requests on my prayer list and also, if they are for a specific day and time, I put them on my calendar with a reminder set. I want to be a faithful friend by praying when asked. When it is put on the prayer list, it is prayed for. 

The final tool to share with you is praying Scripture. Look at this passage, for example: 

For this cause we also, since the day we heard it, do not cease to pray for you, and to desire that ye might be filled with the knowledge of his will in all wisdom and spiritual understanding; That ye might walk worthy of the Lord unto all pleasing, being fruitful in every good work, and increasing in the knowledge of God; Strengthened with all might, according to his glorious power, unto all patience and longsuffering with joyfulness; Giving thanks unto the Father, which hath made us meet to be partakers of the inheritance of the saints in light. Col 1:9-12

What powerful, specific things to pray for someone. If and when we are stuck in the routine of what we always pray for, Scripture gives us new words and ideas. Paul’s prayers are wonderful examples, but there are many more throughout our Bible. Note them as you are reading and make lists of them. Memorize them to have them even easily available when you pray.

May I encourage you to evaluate your prayer life to see if it could use revitalization? Might you be helped by scheduling a prayer time, by using a prayer list, or even prayer Scripture?